US contracter held hostage in Iraq 'dies from the injuries he suffered' 15 months after being released and returned home to Kansas

  • Russell Frost, 49, died at his home in Wichita, Kansas, on Thursday night
  • He and two colleagues were on a contracting job in Dora, Iraq, when they were?kidnapped by members of the Shiite Muslim militia
  • Iraqi officials said the men were in good health when they were handed over to the US Embassy
  • But Frost's daughter, Amanda, revealed her father lost more than 40 pounds in captivity because of dehydration and malnutrition, which caused kidney problems
  • He died of cardiac arrest while awaiting kidney surgery?
  • He also suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder upon his return home and would not sleep unless there was a light on ?

The daughter of an American man who was abducted in Baghdad last year says he has died from health complications stemming from his month in captivity.

Amanda Frost says her father, 49-year-old Russell Frost, died on Thursday at his home in Wichita, Kansas, after going into cardiac arrest in his sleep.

According to his daughters, Frost was waiting for his insurance to approve kidney surgery as he had suffered severe malnutrition and dehydration during his month-long ordeal, causing his kidneys to fail.

Frost was working as a contractor in January 2016 when he and two co-workers, Amr Mohamed and Waiel El-Maadawy, were abducted in the neighborhood of Dora by members of the Shiite Muslim militia.?

Kansas contractor Russell Frost, who was kidnapped in Dora, Iraq, last year died on Thursday from complications related to the month that he spent in captivity, according to his daughter (Pictured, clockwise from top left:?daughter Amanda Frost, daughter Crystal Frost, Russell Frost, grandson Brixton Thompson, and daughter Madison Frost)

Kansas contractor Russell Frost, who was kidnapped in Dora, Iraq, last year died on Thursday from complications related to the month that he spent in captivity, according to his daughter (Pictured, clockwise from top left:?daughter Amanda Frost, daughter Crystal Frost, Russell Frost, grandson Brixton Thompson, and daughter Madison Frost)

Frost had been working as a military contractor in the Middle East for more than a decade when the January 15 kidnapping occurred although it is unclear what his specific assignment was at the time of his kidnapping.

The father-of-three dealt with days of physical torment. His hands were tied together with zip ties - causing circulation to be cut off and his wrists to bleed

The father-of-three dealt with days of physical torment. His hands were tied together with zip ties - causing circulation to be cut off and his wrists to bleed

The father-of-three dealt with days of physical torment. His hands were tied together with zip ties - causing circulation to be cut off and his wrists to bleed, reported The Wichita Eagle.

The ties would eventually be replaced with heavy chains.

His mouth and nose were covered so tightly with packing tape that he had to gasp for breath.?

Iraqi officials said the men were in good health when they were handed over to the US Embassy on February 16 after 31 days in captivity.

But Amanda Frost says her father lost more than 40 pounds in captivity because of dehydration and malnutrition, which caused kidney problems.

'He was battling kidney issues,' she told the Wichita Eagle. 'It was one battle after another. He had multiple surgeries but - his insurance - he wasn't given enough and his kidneys appeared to be failing on him.

'It was hard as his family to watch someone who was so full of life go to someone who could barely move and was in so much pain and swelling.'

Frost also suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder after his return. He would sleep during the day on the floor, in the corner, where he could see everyone in the family and would not sleep at night without a light on.

'The trauma he had suffered so very much affected his life,' Amanda said.?

'He tried to put a stone face on for his girls so we could see the dad we had all known and loved. He didn't want us to see him in any way weak. His focus was on getting back to everything the way it was before this all happened.'

Frost was working as a contractor in January 2016 when he and two co-workers, Amr Mohamed (pictured) and Waiel El-Maadawy, were abducted in Dora, a mixed neighborhood that is home to both Shiites and Sunnis
Frost was working as a contractor in January 2016 when he and two co-workers, Amr Mohamed (pictured) and Waiel El-Maadawy, were abducted in Dora, a mixed neighborhood that is home to both Shiites and Sunnis

Frost was working as a contractor in January 2016 when he and two co-workers, Amr Mohamed (left and right) and Waiel El-Maadawy, were abducted in Dora, a mixed neighborhood that is home to both Shiites and Sunnis

Iraqi officials said the men were in good health when they were handed over to the US Embassy on February 16 after 31 days in captivity (Pictured,?Waiel El-Maadawy, second from the right)

Iraqi officials said the men were in good health when they were handed over to the US Embassy on February 16 after 31 days in captivity (Pictured,?Waiel El-Maadawy, second from the right)

The family has started a GoFundMe page to help cover funeral expenses. So far,?$7,337 has been raised out of a $10,000 goal.?

Frost leaves behind his wife, Tammie, and three daughters, Amanda, Crystal and Madison.

Amanda wrote on the GoFundMe page: 'This exceptional man was the pillar of his family. He meant the world to all who knew him. In January 2016, my dad was kidnapped in Iraq and held captive for 31 days.

'In February 2016, our family received a miracle and our father was released. Upon returning home, he suffered myriad of health issues due to his captivity. My mother and sisters need all the help they can get as my father was the main source of income for his family.?

'My dad was the best. He would do anything he could to help a friend or stranger. He was loved by so many and his absence has created a massive void.'

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