'Your DNA is an abomination': Texas State University paper slammed for 'racist article' by author who said they 'hate' white people

  • Texas State University's Rudy Martinez wrote the article, published Tuesday
  • The student said he 'hated' white people and that they are 'an abberation'
  • He called on the destruction of the social concept of 'whiteness'
  • The university's president called the article 'racist' and apologized?
  • The student paper's editor-in-chief also apologized for printing the piece?

Texas State University's student newspaper has been blasted after it printed an opinion column that excoriated white people for 'subjugating' non-whites whether they know of it or not.

The University Star article, written by student Rudy Martinez, calls white people in the US 'an aberration' and tells them to 'remember this: I hate you because you shouldn't exist.

'Whiteness will be over because we want it to be,' Martinez wrote. 'And when it dies, there will be millions of cultural zombies aimlessly wandering across a vastly changed landscape.'

Texas State University student Rudy Martinez (pictured) kicked up a storm by writing an article in which he said he 'hates' white people and considers them 'an abberation'

Texas State University student Rudy Martinez (pictured) kicked up a storm by writing an article in which he said he 'hates' white people and considers them 'an abberation'

The article (pictured) was denounced as racist by the university's president, and resulted in the paper printing an apology. Martinez's argument was hyperbolic and seemingly confused

The article (pictured) was denounced as racist by the university's president, and resulted in the paper printing an apology. Martinez's argument was hyperbolic and seemingly confused

What Martinez appeared to be trying to suggest in the article - titled 'Your DNA is an abomination' - was that the concept of 'whiteness' was invented in America to separate whites from other races.

That division was then used to help keep other races down, and whites oblivious to the advantages their skin brings them.

It's a sociological theory that's been discussed since the late 20th century; Martinez's contribution appeared to be a lot of divisive and fiery invective and not much else.

The philosophy senior kicked off by saying that he had met 'only a dozen... "decent"' white people in his life.

'You were not born white, you became white,' he said, failing to properly explain that by 'white' he was talking about the category within US society, not the biologically determined color of someone's skin.

'You have been estranged from yourself and, in that absence, have been instilled with an allegiance to a country that was never great,' he complained.

'One that has continuously attempted to push non-whites into non-existence through crusades that have been defended by the law.'

He then went on to accuse the readers - whom he earlier acknowledged as possibly being unaware of their privilege - of having actively 'built' an 'oppressive world'.

Martinez said 'whiteness' was created to divide races and oppress people, and that he wanted to end it - but repeatedly invoked it as a way to define the two groups

Martinez said 'whiteness' was created to divide races and oppress people, and that he wanted to end it - but repeatedly invoked it as a way to define the two groups

'I see white people as an aberration,' he said, and promised 'a constant, ideological struggle' to 'deconstruct whiteness'.

Martinez promised that he would 'win' that struggle, and that 'goodhearted liberals, apathetic nihilists and right-wing extremists' should accept the 'death' of whiteness as 'liberation for all'.

It is unclear how Martinez intends to 'kill whiteness' if he insists on invoking it repeatedly to separate white readers from non-whites.

It's also unclear why the article would be titled 'Your DNA is an abomination' if his problem is with race as a social construct.

Martinez finished up his article on a cheery note, writing, 'remember this: I hate you because you shouldn't exist.?

'You are both the dominant apparatus on the planet and the void in which all cultures, upon meeting you, die.'

The article caused an outcry among students, who derided it as racist, prompting the paper's editor-in-chief, Denise Cervantes, to write an apology.

On Wednesday, she wrote that 'The original intent of the column was to comment on the idea of race and racial identities.

'We acknowledge that the column could have been clearer in its message and that it has caused hurt within our campus community.?

'We apologize and hope that we can move forward to a place of productive dialogue on ways to bring our community together.'?

And in a Facebook post, University President Denise M. Trauth derided the 'racist' article.

'The column's central theme was abhorrent and is contrary to the core values of inclusion and unity that our Bobcat students, faculty, and staff hold dear,' she wrote.

'As president of a university that celebrates its inclusive culture, I detest racism in any manifestation.

'While I appreciate that the Star is a forum for students to freely express their opinions, I expect student editors to exercise good judgment in determining the content that they print.?

'The Star's editors have apologized for the column and are examining their editorial process.'

Denise M Trauth apologized to the students and said that she column was 'racist'. She said that the university's newspaper is examining its editorial process

Denise M Trauth apologized to the students and said that she column was 'racist'. She said that the university's newspaper is examining its editorial process

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