Nazi sympathizer is fired from his job at a bar after being profiled as 'too human' in the New York Times - and now white supremacists are boycotting the restaurant and flooding it with bad reviews online

  • Tony Hovater, 29, who was profiled for his white nationalist beliefs in a New York Times interview on November 25, has been fired from his job at an Ohio bar
  • Hovater worked as a part-time cook at 571 Grill and Draft House in New Carlisle for about a year
  • His wife and brother-in-law, who also worked at the restaurant, have also been let go
  • After the Times story came out, many threatened to boycott the business for employing a Nazi sympathizer
  • And after they fired them, they were hit with a new boycott from neo-Nazis angry about his sacking?
  • Hovater is a member of the Traditionalist Workers Party, which critics call a white supremacist?hate group with ties to the neo-Nazis?

A Nazi sympathizer who was profiled in the New York Times last week has lost his job.?

Tony Hovater, 29, was the subject of a Times article published on November 25, which described him as the 'Nazi sympathizer next door' - someone who would be an average Joe if it weren't for his extreme political beliefs.?

Hovater is a member of the Traditionalist Workers Party, which has been described as a white supremacist hate group allied with the neo-Nazis.?

Hovater himself has taken part in two white supremacist marches this year, but claims he's not racist.

Tony Hovater, a Nazi sympathizer who was profiled in a recent New York Times story, has been fired from his job at a bar in New Carlisle, Ohio?

Tony Hovater, a Nazi sympathizer who was profiled in a recent New York Times story, has been fired from his job at a bar in New Carlisle, Ohio?

Hovater's (right) wife (left) and brother-in-law were also let go from 571 Grill and Draft House after the article
Hovater's wife (above) and brother-in-law were also let go from 571 Grill and Draft House after the article

Hovater's (center) wife (left and right) and brother-in-law were also let go from 571 Grill and Draft House after the article

The manager of 571 Grill and Draft House says Hovater worked part time as a cook for the past year?

The manager of 571 Grill and Draft House says Hovater worked part time as a cook for the past year?

The Times article stated that Hovater was a welder, but readers quickly found out that he also worked a part-time job as a cook at 571 Grill and Draft House near his home in New Carlisle, Ohio.?

After the story was published, the restaurant's manager says that they received numerous complaints and threats about employing a Nazi sympathizer so they decided to let Hovater go.?

His wife and brother-in-law, who also worked at the establishment, have been sacked as well.?

Hovater told the Times that the restaurants owners 'decided to can me' and that he's decided to move 'because of safety reasons'.?

But in a statement, the restaurant said that Hovater himself 'suggested that we release him from ?employment' because of the mounting threats.?

The Daily Stormer, a white supremacist website, is calling on its supporters to lead a boycott against the restaurant over Hovater's firing?

The Daily Stormer, a white supremacist website, is calling on its supporters to lead a boycott against the restaurant over Hovater's firing?

'Due to these very disturbing threats, the employee who was featured in the article suggested that we release him from employment. We have done so and have also released his wife and her brother who also worked for us.?

Hovater is seen above wagging his finger at a bumper sticker for the Southern Poverty Law Center, a civil rights organization that tracks hate groups?

Hovater is seen above wagging his finger at a bumper sticker for the Southern Poverty Law Center, a civil rights organization that tracks hate groups?

'We felt it necessary to fully sever the relationship with them in hopes to protect our 20 other employees from the verbal and social media threats being made from individuals all over the country, and as far as Australia. We neither encourage nor support any forms of hate within our establishment,' a statement from the business, issued on November 29, reads.?

Since Hovater's firing became public, the restaurant has been hit with even more complaints and negative online reviews - this time from white nationalists and neo-Nazis who object to Hovater's firing.?

'This place hates their White customers and promotes the rape of White Women. They will be closing soon mark my words,' a Google reviewer named Josh Plewa wrote.

Others took their negative reviews to Twitter.?

Other social media users praised the restaurant when they learned of Hovater's firing?

Other social media users praised the restaurant when they learned of Hovater's firing?

THE FULL STATEMENT FROM 571 GRILL AND DRAFT HOUSE?

While the 571 Grill and Draft House is happy to be recognized by national news outlets for our 571 Haystack burger, it’s with a sad heart that we must reflect on a divisive political topic that has unfortunately darkened the doorstep of our small business.

A November 25th New York Times article featured one of our employees. In the article, the employee shared his political views, specifically those of being a white nationalist. The article went on, illustrating some very disturbing images and thoughts from this individual. The 571 Grill and Draft House does not share any of these views with this person, nor was the owner aware of them prior to the publishing of this article.

Since the release of this article, we have been swamped with phone calls and social media messages that are threatening and intimidating to both us and our employees. These hateful and disturbing messages are truly saddening to those of us who just want to serve delicious food and cold beers.

Due to these very disturbing threats, the employee who was featured in the article suggested that we release him from employment. We have done so and have also released his wife and her brother who also worked for us. We felt it necessary to fully sever the relationship with them in hopes to protect our 20 other employees from the verbal and social media threats being made from individuals all over the country, and as far as Australia. We neither encourage nor support any forms of hate within our establishment.

We have been in business for a very long time and have a great reputation for supporting our community, and want to continue to do so. We do not check political party affiliation of any of our patrons and as such we are prayerful that members of our community understand that this has been a very difficult situation for us. We hope that you will continue to support us and our small family-owned business.

'Firing people for their political beliefs is disgusting. You should be ashamed of yourselves, you're scum,' Twitter user Younger Z wrote.

The Daily Stormer, a white supremacist website, is calling on its supporters to leave negative reviews online, call the management with their complaints and boycott the business.?

A fundraising website for white supremacists has also raised more than $8,000 for Hovater and his wife as of Thursday.?

There have also been comments from people proud of the management for firing Hovater, who say they'll be stopping by to patronize the business soon.?

'Nice rotating selection of beer and the pizza and burgers are good. But what I love most about this place is that the owner recently fired an admitted Nazi sympathizer after reading an article about him in the NYT.

'Lots of negative reviews have coincidentally been posted here and elsewhere; don't believe it. Propaganda from a group of hateful dirtbags. It's 2017 and we're actually debating on whether Nazis are decent people,' one Yelp user named Jennifer P. wrote.

NEW YORK TIMES 'REGRET' OVER 'NORMALIZING A NAZI'

The New York Times profile on Hovater elicited furious reaction on social media from readers who accused the newspaper of 'normalizing' a man with Nazi views.

'He is the Nazi sympathizer next door, polite and low-key at a time the old boundaries of accepted political activity can seem alarmingly in flux,' the reporter who profiled Hovater, Richard Fausset, writes in the piece.

'Most Americans would be disgusted and baffled by his casually approving remarks about Hitler, disdain for democracy and belief that the races are better off separate.?

'But his tattoos are innocuous pop-culture references: a slice of cherry pie adorns one arm, a homage to the TV show “Twin Peaks.”?

'He says he prefers to spread the gospel of white nationalism with satire. He is a big “Seinfeld” fan.'?

Nate Silver of the political web site FiveThirtyEight tweeted: 'This is the most inexplicable part of all about that "Nazi next door" piece. They've gone out of their way to give this one guy a platform.?

'Not many people in any walk of life are mentioned two dozen times in the NYT over the course of a year or two!'

'The New York Times profile of the white supremacist is really as bad as advertised,' tweeted Jon Lovett.?

'Shocking.'

'Wow, what a lovely gentleman who'd delight anyone's mom!' tweeted Alex Kotch.

The intensity of the backlash prompted the newspaper's national editor, Marc Lacey, to write a piece?addressing the criticism.

'The point of the story was not to normalize anything but to describe the degree to which hate and extremism have become far more normal in American life than many of us want to think,' Lacey wrote.

'We described Mr. Hovater as a bigot, a Nazi sympathizer who posted images on Facebook of a Nazi-like America full of happy white people and swastikas everywhere.

'We understand that some readers wanted more pushback, and we hear that loud and clear.

'We regret the degree to which the piece offended so many readers. We recognize that people can disagree on how best to tell a disagreeable story.

'What we think is indisputable, though, is the need to shed more light, not less, on the most extreme corners of American life and the people who inhabit them.?

'That’s what the story, however imperfectly, tried to do.'????

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