Electrician hid his work GPS tracker inside a crisp packet so he could sneak off and play golf without his boss's knowledge more than 100 times over two years

  • Tom Colella, from Perth, Australia, was fired after he was busted skipping work
  • Tribunal heard he hid his GPS tracker inside a crisp packet which acted as a Faraday Cage, blocking it from transmitting properly
  • Colella then went to play golf 140 times over two years, his employer claimed
  • He appealed his sacking but the Fair Work Commission found it was legitimate?

An electrician was sacked after dropping his GPS tacker in a bag of crisps to block its signal so he could bunk off work.

Tom Colella, from Perth, Australia, used the foil bag as a Faraday Cage to block the tracker's signal before heading off to play golf, employer Aroona Alliance said.

An anonymous tipster informed Aroona of the scheme, saying he was on the course 140 times over two years when he should have been at the office.

Tom Colella, from Perth, used his experience as an electrician to work out that that foil bag would act as a Faraday Cage and block the GPS from transmitting

Tom Colella, from Perth, used his experience as an electrician to work out that that foil bag would act as a Faraday Cage and block the GPS from transmitting

While this claim was never proven, Aroona did show that Colella was actually at home on 21 occasions last April when he should have been working.

He appealed his sacking after arguing his personal digital assistant (PDA) tracking device had a 'glitch' and was giving a false reading.

But his claims were dismissed and the sacking upheld as legitimate.??

Bernie Riordan, with the Fair Work Commission, said Mr Colella used his experience as an electrician to work out that an empty Twisties packet would act as a Faraday Cage if the PDA were placed inside.

'I have taken into account that Mr Colella openly stored his PDA device in an empty foil ''Twisties'' bag,' the commissioner wrote.

A veteran electrician was sacked after using an empty Twisties crisp packet to skip work

A veteran electrician was sacked after using an empty Twisties crisp packet to skip work

'As an experienced electrician, Mr Colella knew that this bag would work as a Farady Cage, thereby preventing the PDA from working properly.'

He added: 'Mr Colella appears to have been deliberately mischievous in acting in this manner.'

A Faraday Cage, devised by Michael Faraday, is an enclosure of conductive materials which blocks electromagnetic signals.

Mr Colella, a senior delegate of the Electrical Trade Union, raised his concerns about privacy when the PDA technology was first introduced by the company.

He admitted to Daily Mail Australia he put the device in the Twisties packet, though flatly denied he had ever skipped work to play golf.

'As the senior delegate I didn't want to be implicated - say I wanted to go on smoko or go and get some spare parts - we didn't want to be tracked,' he said.

'[I did it] to protect myself and the company - they said they wouldn't track us. So I purposely decided to put it in a Twisties packet - it was the simplest option.'

Mr Colella admitted to Daily Mail Australia he put the device in the Twisties packet, though flatly denied he had ever skipped work to play golf

Mr Colella admitted to Daily Mail Australia he put the device in the Twisties packet, though flatly denied he had ever skipped work to play golf

'The reason why this all started is because a person put in a complaint saying I'd been playing golf all the time.

'That was all refuted... this person's allegations were found to be false - then they decided to go into other information.'

Mr Colella, whose annual salary was around $110,000, said he plans to seek permission to appeal the commission's decision. He now makes just a few hundred dollars a week as an Uber driver.

'I'm not working at the moment. I do some Ubering, but at 61 it's pretty tough,' he said.??

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