'We've lost $25,000 and now we're paying for a second wedding': Bali marriage plans in ashes for Australian couple after erupting Mount Agung traps guests on the island and stops them from flying in

  • ?Breana Napper and Josh Major'beach side wedding in Bali has been ruined ?
  • ?The couple were hoping to marry in the beach side town of Sanur on Saturday
  • Mount Agung's eruptions have meant the airspace in Bali is closed indefinitely
  • The couple have spent $25,000 on their wedding and now have to plan another?

Breana Napper and Josh Major had their beachside wedding in Sanur, Bali, all planned out but now they have had to organise a second wedding in Perth as Mount Agung erupts and spoils their plans

Breana Napper and Josh Major had their beachside wedding in Sanur, Bali, all planned out but now they have had to organise a second wedding in Perth as Mount Agung erupts and spoils their plans

A young couple's dream wedding has been ruined after Bali's Mount Agung began to explode – grounding flights to the popular holiday island as thick black smoke filled the air.

Breana Napper and Josh Major had their beachside wedding in Sanur, Bali, all planned out – and were due to say 'I do' in front of 60 friends and family on Saturday.?

But now they have been forced to abandon their dream big day – and organise another wedding in their home town of Perth.?

'We spoke with our wedding planner and she's highly doubtful we'll get anything back, so we've basically lost $25,000 and paying for a second wedding on Saturday,' Ms Napper told Yahoo7.

Some of the bride's family are also stuck in Bali – after heading there early for a quick holiday before the wedding.

Mount Agung has been at the highest alert level since Monday – the same day flights to and from the Indonesian island were completely cancelled.?

Tuesday's closing affected more than 440 flights carrying more than 59,500 passengers.?

Mount Agung has been at the highest alert level since Monday ? the same day flights to and from the Indonesian island were completely cancelled

Mount Agung has been at the highest alert level since Monday – the same day flights to and from the Indonesian island were completely cancelled

'We spoke with our wedding planner and she's highly doubtful we'll get anything back, so we've basically lost $25,000 and paying for a second wedding on Saturday,' Ms Napper said

'We spoke with our wedding planner and she's highly doubtful we'll get anything back, so we've basically lost $25,000 and paying for a second wedding on Saturday,' Ms Napper said

On Wednesday morning Bali airport spokesman Arie Ahsannurohim said volcanic ash has not been detected at the airport yet, but observations show it has reached an altitude of 25,000 feet and was being blown southward and southwestward towards it.

Without aircraft, getting in or out of Bali requires traveling hours by land and boat to an airport on another island.

Australian travel insurance companies have also warned customers would only be covered if they bought policies up to nine weeks ago - before warnings were issued by the Indonesian government.

Authorities have raised the alert for Mount Agung to the highest level and told 100,000 people to leave an area extending 10 kilometers (6 miles) from its crater as it belches grey and white plumes into the sky.

Mount Agung's last major eruption in 1963 killed about 1,100 people.

Some of the bride's family are also stuck in Bali ? after heading there early for a quick holiday before the wedding

Some of the bride's family are also stuck in Bali – after heading there early for a quick holiday before the wedding

Experts said a larger, explosive eruption is possible or Agung could stay at its current level of activity for weeks.

'If it got much worse, it would be really hard to think of. You've got a huge population center, nearly a million people in Denpasar and surroundings, and it's very difficult to envision moving those people further away,' said Richard Arculus, a volcano expert at Australian National University.

He added that an eruption in 1843 was even more explosive than the one in 1963.

'There are many examples in history where you have this kind of seismic buildup - steam ejections of a little bit of ash, growing eruptions of ash to a full-scale stratosphere-reaching column of ash, which can presage a major volcanic event,' he said.

Tuesday's closing affected more than 440 flights carrying more than 59,500 passengers

Tuesday's closing affected more than 440 flights carrying more than 59,500 passengers

Wayan Lanus, who fled his village in Buana Giri with his wife and daughter, said: 'Ash has covered my house on the floor, walls, banana trees outside, everywhere.'

Flows of volcanic mud have been spotted on Agung's slopes, and Arculus warned more are possible since it's the rainy season on Bali.

'They're not making a lot of noise. It's just suddenly coming like a flash flood out of nowhere,' he said. 'You do not want to be near them. Stay out of the valleys.'

Indonesia sits on the Pacific 'Ring of Fire' and has more than 120 active volcanoes.?

Without aircraft, getting in or out of Bali requires traveling hours by land and boat to an airport on another island

Without aircraft, getting in or out of Bali requires traveling hours by land and boat to an airport on another island

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