British mother Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe has post-traumatic stress disorder and suffers uncontrollable moods and depression, doctors in her hellhole Iranian jail confirm

  • Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe tells supporters she has 'made so many good friends'
  • She is behind bars in Iran where she is accused of attempting to topple the state
  • Tehran 'has pictures of BBC pay stub and email showing she trained reporters'
  • They were aired on state TV, increasing the pressure on the UK government ?

British mother Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe has post-traumatic stress disorder, doctors in the Iranian jail where she is being held have confirmed.

The mother of one - being held on spying charges - was assessed by medics at the prison this week.

She told doctors she has uncontrollable moods, particularly panic and anger, her repeated insomnia, and bouts of severe depression.?She mentioned having periods of feeling suicidal and having panic attacks.

British mother Nazanin Ratcliffe has post traumatic stress disorder, doctors in the Iranian jail where she is being held have confirmed?

British mother Nazanin Ratcliffe has post traumatic stress disorder, doctors in the Iranian jail where she is being held have confirmed?

Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe (pictured with husband Richard Ratcliffe) told doctors that she suffers uncontrollable moods, particularly panic and anger, insomnia, and severe depression

Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe (pictured with husband Richard Ratcliffe) told doctors that she suffers uncontrollable moods, particularly panic and anger, insomnia, and severe depression

The prison doctor also noted that she had a PTSD attack on Thursday following the latest TV broadcast when Iranian television aired pictures of a BBC pay stub and an email from 2010 showing she once worked to train Iranian journalists.

The report was intended to increase pressure on the British government which is working to secure her release, her husband said.

She had to be taken to the prison clinic with shock when she saw the report, which also included close-ups of an April 2010 pay stub from her previous employer, the BBC World Service Trust.

After watching the report, she told her husband: 'After 20 months they put out these false stories – why are they doing this to me and my family? I don’t watch the news, or read the papers anymore. I can’t stand it anymore.

“I sometimes wonder if I will ever be normal again. I wonder how far can they go? How far can their stupidity and injustice stretch? They have ruined my life. Why these stories now? Why after all this time? Why are they torturing me?

'If they want to pick a fight with the government, they should just pick a fight with the government. I am just a normal human being and mother. Why do I pay the price when this is a fight between two governments??

?Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe admitted having periods of feeling suicidal and panic attacks. She said the way that she is being shown on TV had induced particular agitation

?Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe admitted having periods of feeling suicidal and panic attacks. She said the way that she is being shown on TV had induced particular agitation

A prison doctor who assessed Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe (pictured with her husband) noted that she had a PTSD attack on Thursday after a TV broadcast when Iranian television aired pictures of a BBC pay stub and an email from 2010 showing she once worked to train Iranian journalists

A prison doctor who assessed Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe (pictured with her husband) noted that she had a PTSD attack on Thursday after a TV broadcast when Iranian television aired pictures of a BBC pay stub and an email from 2010 showing she once worked to train Iranian journalists

When Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe (pictured) saw the claims while sitting with the other women prisoners watching the evening news, she fell off her chair, she told her husband this weekend

When Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe (pictured) saw the claims while sitting with the other women prisoners watching the evening news, she fell off her chair, she told her husband this weekend

'I was so worried about my mum – and whether she had seen it – I kept calling out.'

She went on: 'I felt like I am drowning, deep in the sea, and no one can help me. I cannot see the light. My pot of waiting is full.'

'I have worked so hard not to be damaged when I speak to Gabriella – each time after I saw her I used to cry so much at what I was missing. It used to break my heart. I am trying to think positive thoughts, and to distract myself. But they keep pushing these stories.'

'I have paid a huge price. I have been deprived of my life for what they say I have done. What they say is ridiculous. They have turned it all round to make me into a dangerous person.'

'I was calm yesterday, but I am really angry inside, and I worry – because the scars are so deep. Life will never be as normal as before. I worry about what Gabriella will remember. No one knows.'?

The case of Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe has gained momentum in recent weeks as British Foreign Minister Boris Johnson faces tremendous criticism at home over his handling of it. ?She?now faces new charges that could add 16 years to her prison term.

Actor Emma Thompson and Richard Ratcliffe pose for cameras in London before a march in support of Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, the British-Iranian mother who is in jail in Iran

Actor Emma Thompson and Richard Ratcliffe pose for cameras in London before a march in support of Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, the British-Iranian mother who is in jail in Iran

A programme aired by state TV in Iran focused on Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe (pictured), who is serving a five-year jail term for allegedly planning the 'soft toppling' of Iran's government

A programme aired by state TV in Iran focused on Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe (pictured), who is serving a five-year jail term for allegedly planning the 'soft toppling' of Iran's government

When she saw the claims while sitting with the other women prisoners watching the evening news, she fell off her chair, she told her husband this weekend.?

She collapsed onto one of the prisoner’s beds, eyes closed. She started to sob, but she could not. No sound came out. It took her more than a minute before she was able to breathe properly and cry. She lay completely white, coughing as she couldn’t call out.

Both her husband and her employer Thomson Reuters repeatedly have stressed she was not training journalists or involved in any work regarding Iran while there.

The comments below have not been moderated.

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

We are no longer accepting comments on this article.