Give your wi-fi wings: Google simplifies wifi and gets rid of 'blackspots'

Google Wi-Fi

£299?

One of the downsides to being a technology fan is that you grapple with new gizmos in their teething phase, when using them is a technological torment akin to breaking the Nazi Enigma code.

When I first used wi-fi, setting it up involved hours of typing seemingly random numbers into your PC, while on the verge of tears – much like filling in a tax return.

Google’s gorgeous-looking wi-fi system shows off how far we’ve come. It’s a genuinely simple, supercharged version of wi-fi that finally irons out the problem of ‘blackspots’ in your home.

Google Wi-Fi connects to your existing modem via an ethernet cable, and you then plonk the units around your house

Google Wi-Fi connects to your existing modem via an ethernet cable, and you then plonk the units around your house

For years, I’ve lived with such a dead zone that sits, with bitter irony, exactly where I want to put my wi-fi-powered office stereo. As a result, the thing has basically been a paperweight.

Within ten minutes of opening the Google Wi-Fi box, it was playing music without a splutter. Google Wi-Fi is a new kind of router: a ‘mesh’ system, with several units (you get two for £229, but can add more). The system automatically connects devices to the ‘right’ unit, so you are no longer forced to sit down at one end of the house just to bask in the wi-fi rays.

Google Wi-Fi connects to your existing modem via an ethernet cable, and you then plonk the units around your house (ideally within a sight-line from another unit). They light up with a pleasingly sci-fi glow – and after that, the app alerts you if there are any hiccups.

For parents who want to get high-tech about spoiling their children’s fun, you can set ‘rules’ for different devices that connect to Google Wi-Fi, so that (for instance) you can shut down the internet on their iPad at bedtime.

The system automatically connects devices to the ‘right’ unit, so you are no longer forced to sit down at one end of the house just to bask in the wi-fi rays

The system automatically connects devices to the ‘right’ unit, so you are no longer forced to sit down at one end of the house just to bask in the wi-fi rays

Better still, if you really want to become a domestic Kim Jong Un, you can also prioritise one device, so that (say) your work PC gets faster internet than your children’s Netflix.

It’s those little things that make you smile.

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