Avoid drinking too much and stroke the ego of your boss: Expert reveals how you can use the office Christmas party to get ahead at your workplace

  • Chris Golis said the annual office get-together is the perfect time to network?
  • Effective communication with your manager could stand you in good stead
  • But he said avoid the temptation to drink too much on the company's coin?

The end of the year is almost upon us, which means we all have a chance to kick up our heels at the annual office Christmas party.

While the event can be a bawdy affair, if you're smart and thinking strategically, there's a chance you can use the annual shindig to put yourself in good stead for a promotion next year.

Emotional intelligence expert Chris Golis?said as well as a way to connect with colleagues, the occasion offers a great opportunity to network as it's the one time everyone, including management, are together.

Networking opportunity: Expert Chris Golis (pictured) said the annual office Christmas party can be a great way to connect colleagues and management

Networking opportunity: Expert Chris Golis (pictured) said the annual office Christmas party can be a great way to connect colleagues and management

'Most bosses promote people they like, and so the work Christmas party is a chance to work on your relationship and even potentially plant the see regarding a pay rise or promotion.'

Though there's the temptation to get eat and drink as much as possible, especially as it's on the company's coin, you could be better placed practicing a little restraint.

'If you're smart about it and don't come across as too much of a crawler you can set yourself up for the year ahead by having an intelligent and meaningful conversation with your superiors,' Mr Golis said.

Though it's tempting to kick up your heels at the yearly shindig, you could be better placed practicing a little restraint

Though it's tempting to kick up your heels at the yearly shindig, you could be better placed practicing a little restraint

He also suggested choosing an opportune moment to have a conversation with your manager.

'Making a beeline straight for the executive team can make you look like an opportunistic social climber, so picking your moment is very important,' he said.

Other good questions to ask your boss at a social event:

Mr Golis said family, pets and holidays are all good subjects to discuss with your boss. Some questions include:

What's the best book you've read in the last year?

Are you going anywhere special this Christmas?

Have you got a pet? Or did you have one?

Source: Emotionalintelligencecourse.com

'Start off by having a conversation for five to 10 minutes about anything but work,' he added.

And if you're stuck for questions, the expert in emotional intelligence offers a reminder that everyone's favourite topic of conversation is themselves.

'Then you can perhaps steer the conversation more towards the office environment by asking them what their best decision was this year.

'Conversely, if you know the company hasn't had a great year, say it's been a big year and you're looking forward to next year.'

The idea isn't to get your know your boss as such, more to foster a more personal connection, Mr Golis outlined.

'Once you've got what you want out of the conversation with your manager, thank them for their time and leave them alone for the rest of the night.'

Christmas parties can be fraught, and in order to avoid any social gaffes or faux pas there are some important rules to follow

Christmas parties can be fraught, and in order to avoid any social gaffes or faux pas there are some important rules to follow

Speaking previously to Daily Mail Australia, founder and CEO of the Sydney School of Protocol,?Julie Lamberg-Burnet said Christmas parties can be fraught.

Etiquette expert Julie Lamberg-Burnet said Christmas parties can be fraught

Etiquette expert Julie Lamberg-Burnet said Christmas parties can be fraught

'The office event is an opportunity to get to know your peers, managers and colleagues in a more informal setting. Making a brief appearance does not "cut it" and may be perceived as placing your priorities elsewhere.'

One of the key points to consider at the event, was to think about how your 'etiquette intelligence' revealed itself, Ms Lamberg-Burnet said.

She explained rushing to the bar and piling up your plate conveys a certain attitude, and not one that leaves a positive impression.

Avoid the temptation to stick with one group over the course of the night, instead mix and mingle with a range of colleagues?

Avoid the temptation to stick with one group over the course of the night, instead mix and mingle with a range of colleagues?

Instead she suggested a 'mix and mingle' approach and to partake in conversation with a range of colleagues.

'Small bites and small sips in between good conversation works the best,' she said.?

While it might be tempting to let it all hang out, throwing caution to the wind and flirting with all and sundry could see your professional standing tarred.?

'Don’t over impose yourself and make either risqué remarks or innuendos to attract attention to yourself. This style of behavior is quite distasteful,' Ms Lamberg-Burnet said.

While it might be tempting to let it all hang out, throwing caution to the wind and flirting with all and sundry could see your professional standing tarred

While it might be tempting to let it all hang out, throwing caution to the wind and flirting with all and sundry could see your professional standing tarred

Additionally, the etiquette expert makes a strong case for dressing the part, as not only does this give you a great opportunity to showcase your 'brand', it's a prime opportunity to create a lasting impression.

She suggests it's worth doing a little research first by checking on the venue your event will be hosted at, and dress accordingly.?

'Speak with the host to ensure that what you are planning to wear is suitable for the occasion. Check the weather!'?

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